Displaying items by tag: discussion

Tuesday, 22 June 2021 06:27

PME 832 -Summer 2021 - How to discuss!

Hello Students,

This course, and most Queens PME course, rely heavily on discussion forums, not only for grading but for the social construction of knowledge. So, let me share some ideas on how to make the most of your efforts in these discussion forums.

In a series of interviews on the experience of using discussion boards in these courses, some of your classmates and peers have made the following comments:

"The richest learning for me, has come out of those discussion boards and looking at other people's interpretations of things and talking to people about, or reading their experiences with varying things. And I've realized now that a lot of what I enjoy, a lot of my learning comes from is actually, from those discussion boards."

Many of the people I have interviewed found themselves actually quite surprised by the value and experiences they found in the discussion forums. For example, the following person described how the forum gave them the chance to really review the asynchronous discussion and think clearly about their own perspective on that particular issue before responding. The additional time offered by the asynchronous format allows for deeper reflection on the topic and stronger responses and understanding.

So, some of them I read two or three times, then I thought did I read this right? I didn’t respond right away, so I would read it first, step away and then come back. Sometimes I reread the notes before I responded because I thought, "I wanna get this right before my response to the person".

In other cases, people found that they were equally challenged by and benefited from providing answers to their classmates. They found that by thinking through the questions posed to them, they were able to clarify for themselves their own thoughts on the particular issue and then provide a meaningful response to their classmates.

"I think the big thing that helped me was reading other people's posts and trying to answer the questions that they had. So when I read someone else's, I actually connected and I had an answer for them. It made me feel very excited, because I was like, "Look, I'm helping this individual! I've experienced this and I've tried something and hey, here's what my experience has been."

  One way to ensure that people take time to read your post so that you receive feedback on it and can initiate a conversation, is to take the time to format your post.

I think being aware of what it looks like when someone opens it, it's like when I hand an assignment to students that's a full page of just writing, I know that they're gonna look at it and go, "Yeah, no". I feel similarly with the discussion posts. I know there's a couple of times where I would open one and it was just a wall of text and I was like, "I don't know if I'm gonna read this one", and it wasn't due from merit.

Consider the following outline for creating your post and engaging in the forum.

discussion forum post bHow to participate in a discussion forum.

To benefit from the discussion board environment and the chance for the social construction of knowledge, participants must both openly share their thoughts, and invite responses from others. Inviting responses includes paying attention to the responses.

As I have scanned the discussion forum posts over the past few years, I have noticed an important correlation between the number of comments a participant posts on others' posts, and the number of responses they receive to their own post. There are clear patterns that emerge just from the pattern of responses in the forum, without even opening up the posts. As a person comments on others' posts, those others then come to the initial respondent and comment on his or her post. In turn, this leads to greater feedback, interaction and transformation of that participant's knowledge resulting in excellent final projects.

I share a gentle reminder that you will will benefit much more from shorter, more frequent visits to the forums.

Finally, I also invite you to consider the community of inquiry as a model for online interactions.

coi new

Watch this video I have created and narrated on the Community of Inquiry

Published in PME 832 - Summer 2021

Our current cohort of students for Collaborative Inquiry - 801 - Spring 2021 - is a bit smaller at only 12 students. This makes the use of the discussion forums even more important for students to gain the full benefits of a distance format course.

During the Module 1 assignments, I noted that there was not as much interaction as I wanted to see and so 'encouraged' (deducted points from) many of the students to participate beyond the minimal requirements of the assignment. 

See the results in the Module 2 assignment - Technology Montage:

discussion forum replies sp21 801

This encouragement may not have contributed to the increase, but then again ... 

Published in PME 801 - Spring 2021
Saturday, 17 April 2021 13:47

PME 801 - How to discuss!

Hello Students,

This course, and most Queens PME course, rely heavily on discussion forums, not only for grading but for the social construction of knowledge. So, let me share some ideas on how to make the most of your efforts in these discussion forums.

In a series of interviews on the experience of using discussion boards in these courses, some of your classmates and peers have made the following comments:

"The richest learning for me, has come out of those discussion boards and looking at other people's interpretations of things and talking to people about, or reading their experiences with varying things. And I've realized now that a lot of what I enjoy, a lot of my learning comes from is actually, from those discussion boards."

Many of the people I have interviewed found themselves actually quite surprised by the value and experiences they found in the discussion forums. For example, the following person described how the forum gave them the chance to really review the asynchronous discussion and think clearly about their own perspective on that particular issue before responding. The additional time offered by the asynchronous format allows for deeper reflection on the topic and stronger responses and understanding.

So, some of them I read two or three times, then I thought did I read this right? I didn’t respond right away, so I would read it first, step away and then come back. Sometimes I reread the notes before I responded because I thought, "I wanna get this right before my response to the person".

In other cases, people found that they were equally challenged by and benefited from providing answers to their classmates. They found that by thinking through the questions posed to them, they were able to clarify for themselves their own thoughts on the particular issue and then provide a meaningful response to their classmates.

"I think the big thing that helped me was reading other people's posts and trying to answer the questions that they had. So when I read someone else's, I actually connected and I had an answer for them. It made me feel very excited, because I was like, "Look, I'm helping this individual! I've experienced this and I've tried something and hey, here's what my experience has been."

  One way to ensure that people take time to read your post so that you receive feedback on it and can initiate a conversation, is to take the time to format your post.

I think being aware of what it looks like when someone opens it, it's like when I hand an assignment to students that's a full page of just writing, I know that they're gonna look at it and go, "Yeah, no". I feel similarly with the discussion posts. I know there's a couple of times where I would open one and it was just a wall of text and I was like, "I don't know if I'm gonna read this one", and it wasn't due from merit.

Consider the following outline for creating your post and engaging in the forum.

discussion forum postHow to participate in a discussion forum.

To benefit from the discussion board environment and the chance for the social construction of knowledge, participants must both openly share their thoughts, and invite responses from others. Inviting responses includes paying attention to the responses.

As I have scanned the discussion forum posts over the past few years, I have noticed an important correlation between the number of comments a participant posts on others' posts, and the number of responses they receive to their own post. There are clear patterns that emerge just from the pattern of responses in the forum, without even opening up the posts. As a person comments on others' posts, those others then come to the initial respondent and comment on his or her post. In turn, this leads to greater feedback, interaction and transformation of that participant's knowledge resulting in excellent final projects.

I share a gentle reminder that you will will benefit much more from shorter, more frequent visits to the forums.

Finally, I also invite you to consider the community of inquiry as a model for online interactions.

coi new

Watch this video I have created and narrated on the Community of Inquiry

Published in PME 801 - Spring 2021
Tuesday, 12 January 2021 12:12

PME 801 - How to discuss!

Hello Students,

This course, and most Queens PME course, rely heavily on discussion forums, not only for grading but for the social construction of knowledge. So, let me share some ideas on how to make the most of your efforts in these discussion forums.

In a series of interviews on the experience of using discussion boards in these courses, some of your classmates and peers have made the following comments:

"The richest learning for me, has come out of those discussion boards and looking at other people's interpretations of things and talking to people about, or reading their experiences with varying things. And I've realized now that a lot of what I enjoy, a lot of my learning comes from is actually, from those discussion boards."

Many of the people I have interviewed found themselves actually quite surprised by the value and experiences they found in the discussion forums. For example, the following person described how the forum gave them the chance to really review the asynchronous discussion and think clearly about their own perspective on that particular issue before responding. The additional time offered by the asynchronous format allows for deeper reflection on the topic and stronger responses and understanding.

So, some of them I read two or three times, then I thought did I read this right? I didn’t respond right away, so I would read it first, step away and then come back. Sometimes I reread the notes before I responded because I thought, "I wanna get this right before my response to the person".

In other cases, people found that they were equally challenged by and benefited from providing answers to their classmates. They found that by thinking through the questions posed to them, they were able to clarify for themselves their own thoughts on the particular issue and then provide a meaningful response to their classmates.

"I think the big thing that helped me was reading other people's posts and trying to answer the questions that they had. So when I read someone else's, I actually connected and I had an answer for them. It made me feel very excited, because I was like, "Look, I'm helping this individual! I've experienced this and I've tried something and hey, here's what my experience has been."

  One way to ensure that people take time to read your post so that you receive feedback on it and can initiate a conversation, is to take the time to format your post.

I think being aware of what it looks like when someone opens it, it's like when I hand an assignment to students that's a full page of just writing, I know that they're gonna look at it and go, "Yeah, no". I feel similarly with the discussion posts. I know there's a couple of times where I would open one and it was just a wall of text and I was like, "I don't know if I'm gonna read this one", and it wasn't due from merit.

Consider the following outline for creating your post and engaging in the forum.

discussion forum postHow to participate in a discussion forum.

To benefit from the discussion board environment and the chance for the social construction of knowledge, participants must both openly share their thoughts, and invite responses from others. Inviting responses includes paying attention to the responses.

As I have scanned the discussion forum posts over the past few years, I have noticed an important correlation between the number of comments a participant posts on others' posts, and the number of responses they receive to their own post. There are clear patterns that emerge just from the pattern of responses in the forum, without even opening up the posts. As a person comments on others' posts, those others then come to the initial respondent and comment on his or her post. In turn, this leads to greater feedback, interaction and transformation of that participant's knowledge resulting in excellent final projects.

I share a gentle reminder that you will will benefit much more from shorter, more frequent visits to the forums.

Finally, I also invite you to consider the community of inquiry as a model for online interactions.

coi new

Watch this video I have created and narrated on the Community of Inquiry

Published in PME 801 - Winter 2021
Tuesday, 12 January 2021 12:12

PME 832 - How to discuss!

Hello Students,

This course, and most Queens PME course, rely heavily on discussion forums, not only for grading but for the social construction of knowledge. So, let me share some ideas on how to make the most of your efforts in these discussion forums.

In a series of interviews on the experience of using discussion boards in these courses, some of your classmates and peers have made the following comments:

"The richest learning for me, has come out of those discussion boards and looking at other people's interpretations of things and talking to people about, or reading their experiences with varying things. And I've realized now that a lot of what I enjoy, a lot of my learning comes from is actually, from those discussion boards."

Many of the people I have interviewed found themselves actually quite surprised by the value and experiences they found in the discussion forums. For example, the following person described how the forum gave them the chance to really review the asynchronous discussion and think clearly about their own perspective on that particular issue before responding. The additional time offered by the asynchronous format allows for deeper reflection on the topic and stronger responses and understanding.

So, some of them I read two or three times, then I thought did I read this right? I didn’t respond right away, so I would read it first, step away and then come back. Sometimes I reread the notes before I responded because I thought, "I wanna get this right before my response to the person".

In other cases, people found that they were equally challenged by and benefited from providing answers to their classmates. They found that by thinking through the questions posed to them, they were able to clarify for themselves their own thoughts on the particular issue and then provide a meaningful response to their classmates.

"I think the big thing that helped me was reading other people's posts and trying to answer the questions that they had. So when I read someone else's, I actually connected and I had an answer for them. It made me feel very excited, because I was like, "Look, I'm helping this individual! I've experienced this and I've tried something and hey, here's what my experience has been."

  One way to ensure that people take time to read your post so that you receive feedback on it and can initiate a conversation, is to take the time to format your post.

I think being aware of what it looks like when someone opens it, it's like when I hand an assignment to students that's a full page of just writing, I know that they're gonna look at it and go, "Yeah, no". I feel similarly with the discussion posts. I know there's a couple of times where I would open one and it was just a wall of text and I was like, "I don't know if I'm gonna read this one", and it wasn't due from merit.

Consider the following outline for creating your post and engaging in the forum.

discussion forum postHow to participate in a discussion forum.

To benefit from the discussion board environment and the chance for the social construction of knowledge, participants must both openly share their thoughts, and invite responses from others. Inviting responses includes paying attention to the responses.

As I have scanned the discussion forum posts over the past few years, I have noticed an important correlation between the number of comments a participant posts on others' posts, and the number of responses they receive to their own post. There are clear patterns that emerge just from the pattern of responses in the forum, without even opening up the posts. As a person comments on others' posts, those others then come to the initial respondent and comment on his or her post. In turn, this leads to greater feedback, interaction and transformation of that participant's knowledge resulting in excellent final projects.

I share a gentle reminder that you will will benefit much more from shorter, more frequent visits to the forums.

Finally, I also invite you to consider the community of inquiry as a model for online interactions.

coi new

Watch this video I have created and narrated on the Community of Inquiry

Published in PME 832 - Winter 2021
Saturday, 19 September 2020 13:22

PME 832 - How to discuss!

Hello Students,

This course, and most Queens PME course, rely heavily on discussion forums, not only for grading but for the social construction of knowledge. So, let me share some ideas on how to make the most of your efforts in these discussion forums.

In a series of interviews on the experience of using discussion boards in these courses, some of your classmates and peers have made the following comments:

"The richest learning for me, has come out of those discussion boards and looking at other people's interpretations of things and talking to people about, or reading their experiences with varying things. And I've realized now that a lot of what I enjoy, a lot of my learning comes from is actually, from those discussion boards."

Many of the people I have interviewed found themselves actually quite surprised by the value and experiences they found in the discussion forums. For example, the following person described how the forum gave them the chance to really review the asynchronous discussion and think clearly about their own perspective on that particular issue before responding. The additional time offered by the asynchronous format allows for deeper reflection on the topic and stronger responses and understanding.

So, some of them I read two or three times, then I thought did I read this right? I didn’t respond right away, so I would read it first, step away and then come back. Sometimes I reread the notes before I responded because I thought, "I wanna get this right before my response to the person".

In other cases, people found that they were equally challenged by and benefited from providing answers to their classmates. They found that by thinking through the questions posed to them, they were able to clarify for themselves their own thoughts on the particular issue and then provide a meaningful response to their classmates.

"I think the big thing that helped me was reading other people's posts and trying to answer the questions that they had. So when I read someone else's, I actually connected and I had an answer for them. It made me feel very excited, because I was like, "Look, I'm helping this individual! I've experienced this and I've tried something and hey, here's what my experience has been."

  One way to ensure that people take time to read your post so that you receive feedback on it and can initiate a conversation, is to take the time to format your post.

I think being aware of what it looks like when someone opens it, it's like when I hand an assignment to students that's a full page of just writing, I know that they're gonna look at it and go, "Yeah, no". I feel similarly with the discussion posts. I know there's a couple of times where I would open one and it was just a wall of text and I was like, "I don't know if I'm gonna read this one", and it wasn't due from merit.

Consider the following outline for creating your post and engaging in the forum.

discussion forum postHow to participate in a discussion forum.

To benefit from the discussion board environment and the chance for the social construction of knowledge, participants must both openly share their thoughts, and invite responses from others. Inviting responses includes paying attention to the responses.

As I have scanned the discussion forum posts over the past few years, I have noticed an important correlation between the number of comments a participant posts on others' posts, and the number of responses they receive to their own post. There are clear patterns that emerge just from the pattern of responses in the forum, without even opening up the posts. As a person comments on others' posts, those others then come to the initial respondent and comment on his or her post. In turn, this leads to greater feedback, interaction and transformation of that participant's knowledge resulting in excellent final projects.

I share a gentle reminder that you will will benefit much more from shorter, more frequent visits to the forums.

Finally, I also invite you to consider the community of inquiry as a model for online interactions.

coi new

Watch this video I have created and narrated on the Community of Inquiry

Published in PME 832 - Fall 2020
Friday, 24 July 2020 17:06

Responses to Mind Maps Module

Hello,

Here is an update on the general feedback that I have shared with you on your Mind Map discussion forums.

There were many excellent points, discussions and conversations among the posts. I will note three that stood out to me as particularly relevant to our course:

  • One of you commented about following up on service learning projects and used the example of going back to a creek to see if salmon were actually returning to the creek as a result of the project the year before. I responded that:
    • I like the idea of going back to the creek to see if the salmon actually are coming back. This would highlight the fact that any such service learning really does need to connect the community in a concrete way to ensure that there is impact. Otherwise, what was the point for the community? The students may have enjoyed the project and learned lots of exciting and relevant things, but did they actually serve the community?
  • One of you commented on the need to connect personally in class before going our into the community. My response was related to the use of technology to connect to each other before even going into the class
    • One element of the project you mention focuses on asynchronous communications. I think these tools such as discussion forms and blogs are essential tools that allow us to really think deeply about our work, so that when we are together we are prepared to discuss, challenge and progress. You mention in your response to me that connections IN the class are necessary to prepare for outside the class. How about flipping that around and thinking that connections OUTside the class are necessary to prepare us for when we are in the class?
  • Finally, in response to a question from me about ensuring student participation and curriculum alignment, one of you shared this model from Stanford Design School (https://dschool.stanford.edu/)

stanford d school


I generally graded your discussion efforts based on the rubric although I did take some liberty with it to ensure it was applied fairly.

The first criteria, the quality of your post, notes that the top standard is:

"Shares and cites research, scholarship and well-grounded professional resources to support ideas. Links key concepts introduced in the module to personal experiences. Text is error free and meets the required word count."

For the most part, everybody met that standard, although I did take off one point if you did not respond to questions posed to you. I felt this was a critical element of 'sharing'.

The second criteria looks at the timeliness of your post:

"Takes initiative to lead communication with others. Initial Post is published before the due date to enable others to read and respond."

Most of you met this criteria, although I did take another liberty and reduce your grade in this section if you made all your posts and responses before the due date. This reduces your own experience as you miss many of your peers' comments. Also, it means that many of you did not respond to questions posed to you.

The third criteria is regarding the nature of your interactions:

"Supports the learning of others by critiquing their ideas through the use of evidence, reason and logic. Responses significantly expand understandings and foster further discussion by asking relevant questions and sharing relevant resources or ideas."

If you did not respond to two or more classmates, I lowered your grade.


 

Sunday, 28 June 2020 14:59

Discussion Boards: How to discuss!

I have posted the following the comments on discussion boards for my students. I also want to share the post here.


Hello Students,

This course, and most Queens PME course, rely heavily on discussion forums, not only for grading but for the social construction of knowledge. So, let me share some ideas on how to make the most of your efforts in these discussion forums.

In a series of interviews on the experience of using discussion boards in these courses, some of your classmates and peers have made the following comments:

"The richest learning for me, has come out of those discussion boards and looking at other people's interpretations of things and talking to people about, or reading their experiences with varying things. And I've realized now that a lot of what I enjoy, a lot of my learning comes from is actually, from those discussion boards."

Many of the people I have interviewed found themselves actually somewhat surprised by the value they found in the discussion forums. For example, the following person described how the forum gave them the chance to really review the asynchronous discussion and think clearly about their own perspective on that particular issue before responding. The additional time offered by the asynchronous format allows for deeper reflection on the topic and stronger responses and understanding.

So, some of them I read two or three times, then I thought did I read this right? I didn’t respond right away, so I would read it first, step away and then come back. Sometimes I reread the notes before I responded because I thought, "I wanna get this right before my response to the person".

In other cases, people found that they were equally challenged by and benefited from providing answers to their classmates. They found that by thinking through the questions posed to them, they were able to clarify for themselves their own thoughts on the particular issue and then provide a meaningful response to their classmates.

"I think the big thing that helped me was reading other people's posts and trying to answer the questions that they had. So when I read someone else's, I actually connected and I had an answer for them. It made me feel very excited, because I was like, "Look, I'm helping this individual! I've experienced this and I've tried something and hey, here's what my experience has been."

  One way to ensure that people take time to read your post so that you receive feedback on it and can initiate a conversation, is to take the time to format your post.

I think being aware of what it looks like when someone opens it, it's like when I hand an assignment to students that's a full page of just writing, I know that they're gonna look at it and go, "Yeah, no". I feel similarly with the discussion posts. I know there's a couple of times where I would open one and it was just a wall of text and I was like, "I don't know if I'm gonna read this one", and it wasn't due from merit.

Consider the following outline for creating your post and engaging in the forum.

discussion forum postHow to participate in a discussion forum.

To benefit from the discussion board environment and the chance for the social construction of knowledge, participants must both openly share their thoughts, and invite responses from others. Inviting responses includes paying attention to the responses.

As I have scanned the discussion forum posts over the past few years, I have noticed an important correlation between the number of comments a participant posts on others' posts, and the number of responses they receive to their own post. There are clear patterns that emerge just from the pattern of responses in the forum, without even opening up the posts. As a person comments on others' posts, those others then come to the initial respondent and comment on his or her post. In turn, this leads to greater feedback, interaction and transformation of that participant's knowledge resulting in excellent final projects.

I share a gentle reminder that you will will benefit much more from shorter, more frequent visits to the forums.

Finally, I also invite you to consider the community of inquiry as a model for online interactions.

coi new

Watch this video I have created and narrated on the Community of Inquiry

Published in Teaching and Learning
Sunday, 28 June 2020 13:52

832 - How to discuss!

Hello Students,

This course, and most Queens PME course, rely heavily on discussion forums, not only for grading but for the social construction of knowledge. So, let me share some ideas on how to make the most of your efforts in these discussion forums.

In a series of interviews on the experience of using discussion boards in these courses, some of your classmates and peers have made the following comments:

"The richest learning for me, has come out of those discussion boards and looking at other people's interpretations of things and talking to people about, or reading their experiences with varying things. And I've realized now that a lot of what I enjoy, a lot of my learning comes from is actually, from those discussion boards."

Many of the people I have interviewed found themselves actually somewhat surprised by the value they found in the discussion forums. For example, the following person described how the forum gave them the chance to really review the asynchronous discussion and think clearly about their own perspective on that particular issue before responding. The additional time offered by the asynchronous format allows for deeper reflection on the topic and stronger responses and understanding.

So, some of them I read two or three times, then I thought did I read this right? I didn’t respond right away, so I would read it first, step away and then come back. Sometimes I reread the notes before I responded because I thought, "I wanna get this right before my response to the person".

In other cases, people found that they were equally challenged by and benefited from providing answers to their classmates. They found that by thinking through the questions posed to them, they were able to clarify for themselves their own thoughts on the particular issue and then provide a meaningful response to their classmates.

"I think the big thing that helped me was reading other people's posts and trying to answer the questions that they had. So when I read someone else's, I actually connected and I had an answer for them. It made me feel very excited, because I was like, "Look, I'm helping this individual! I've experienced this and I've tried something and hey, here's what my experience has been."

  One way to ensure that people take time to read your post so that you receive feedback on it and can initiate a conversation, is to take the time to format your post.

I think being aware of what it looks like when someone opens it, it's like when I hand an assignment to students that's a full page of just writing, I know that they're gonna look at it and go, "Yeah, no". I feel similarly with the discussion posts. I know there's a couple of times where I would open one and it was just a wall of text and I was like, "I don't know if I'm gonna read this one", and it wasn't due from merit.

Consider the following outline for creating your post and engaging in the forum.

discussion forum postHow to participate in a discussion forum.

To benefit from the discussion board environment and the chance for the social construction of knowledge, participants must both openly share their thoughts, and invite responses from others. Inviting responses includes paying attention to the responses.

As I have scanned the discussion forum posts over the past few years, I have noticed an important correlation between the number of comments a participant posts on others' posts, and the number of responses they receive to their own post. There are clear patterns that emerge just from the pattern of responses in the forum, without even opening up the posts. As a person comments on others' posts, those others then come to the initial respondent and comment on his or her post. In turn, this leads to greater feedback, interaction and transformation of that participant's knowledge resulting in excellent final projects.

I share a gentle reminder that you will will benefit much more from shorter, more frequent visits to the forums.

Finally, I also invite you to consider the community of inquiry as a model for online interactions.

coi new

Watch this video I have created and narrated on the Community of Inquiry

Saturday, 18 January 2020 14:36

832 - How to discuss!

Hello - I have received a few email regarding discussion board posts, which are sufficiently significant to warrant a post and general response to all students in these courses.

The first email was regarding my response to the post. In each case, I try to respond to the student as personally as possible. I find points in the post that highlight core concepts of the course and then press students for further clarification, responses and thought.

In one email, I wrote:

"First, I will clarify that discussion board activities are primarily a place for you as a student to share your thoughts and demand answers. And I like to emphasize the notion of demanding answers. This is a crucial part of the social construction of knowledge. The questions you ask of others are as well a means of not only furthering their own knowledge, but helping you to clarify their thoughts and put them in your own context."

To benefit from the discussion board environment and the chance for the social construction of knowledge, participants must both openly share their thoughts, and invite responses from others. Inviting responses includes paying attention to the responses.

I also wrote, 

"Specifically, I did find that your answer was focused on planning in general. So, you should take this feedback as a source of motivation to refine your answer. So, in terms of the goal of the activity, I would deem that you have been highly successful to share your thoughts, receive feedback and then proceed to rethink and hopefully transform your thoughts on this section.

In terms of a grade, I always look at each student’s effort to do exactly what you did. I always think that every answer and response in these forums can be rethought and improved! I hope that gives you confidence to share your thoughts and challenge others.

In response to another question about formatting, I will say that when I see a well formatted, well written post, I can really focus and give my best response. In research on participant reactions to discussion boards, a primary determinant if someone will read your post is if it is well formatted and presented with clear, short paragraphs.

I also want to comment on the means of participation in the discussion forum. As I scan over the discussion forum posts, both in this course and over the past few years, I have noted a direct correlation between the number of comments a participant posts on others' posts, and the number of responses they receive to their own post. In turn, this leads to greater feedback, interaction and transformation of that participant's knowledge resulting in excellent final projects.

Finally, I share a gentle reminder that you will will benefit much more from shorter, more frequent visits to the forums.

 

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