Dr. Paul Leslie

Dr. Paul Leslie

Saturday, 21 February 2015 22:17

EPC 3903 - Weeks 4 & 5 - Take charge

Portfolio Approach

By now, your cohort and fellow students are quite possibly the most experienced portfoliers in our Education program, thus in the college and most likely in the entire HCT system. I have to say I am duly impressed with what you have been able to achieve.

Have a look at this presentation that I am going to present at INTED in Madrid. Your class is the best prepared class to do this! Make me proud.

Your assessment is to do this. In the assessment document, pay particular attention to the presentation section. From an experiential learning point of view, your ability to describe what you have done and how you have captured it is paramount. The journals should contribute to your presentation.

portfolio present

You should have lots of ideas in your shared folder to review and discuss on your way to getting ready for your practicum. 

 

Saturday, 21 February 2015 22:02

EDT 3503 - Weeks 4 & 5

Presentations

This week, we will spend some time in our Tuesday class to work out your presentations. You should have already discussed this with Mr. Basel to a degree. I can answer any questions should you have any.

You will present your work on Thursday in pairs.

Moodle

We also need to make sure you get your learning objects repaired. We have worked out a plan to make your lives easier. If you have not started already, then this seems to be the easiest way to proceed:

We hope that this process will give you ample materials for your TP. Once you get to your placement, you will need to preview the materials with your MST in order to select the most appropriate materials. 

As I prepare for my presentations at the INTED conference in Madrid, I am working through and externalizing my ideas about how the Portfolio Approach to Learning supports and promotes the concept of Integrity in experiential learning.

 


Ill-structured Cognitive Domains

Spiro et al (1992) discuss the concept of ill-structured cognitive domains. They use two disciplines to highlight their theory: Medicine and Education. In the first example, they discuss a patient who comes in for a belly-ache. The number of issues that could cause the same condition is overwhelming and could even be the result of several combined causes. 

Similarly in Education, there are so many processes and competing factors at play in a classroom, that the practitioner must be constantly alert for changes and be able to adapt to developing circumstances. As shown in this diagram, educational processes are often:

  • ill-defined
  • ill-aligned
  • non-linear

They may also be

  • concurrent
  • consecutive
  • short or occasional

ed processes

As such, they are often very difficult to discuss, to manage and to capture in a portfolio demonstration of competency. We are then reduced in our ability to learn from our experiences because we have had difficulty to capture them.

In a portfolio approach, as argued in my upcoming paper for the conference, the various processes can be much more easily captured through the use of 21st century tools supported by the community of inquiry model.

ed processes port approach

If we can capture our processes more easily and then reflect on them more readily, we will be able to achieve a higher sense of integrity when considering our work.

Speaking of a portfolio approach, here are the original board notes:

demon board 

Integrity

As we teach, we have concrete experiences, trying out new lesson plans and ideas, we perform reflective observation by examining the results of our work. We then consider the abstract concepts of those reflections and try to relate them to our existing ideas about the world. We then practice active experimentation by applying our new and improved concepts to revised lesson plans and activities. We take those new ideas into our classroom and have new concrete experiences.

kolb 3d

 

As new practitioners, we may expect our students to go through 2 to 3 such cycles over the course of a 6 week practicum, while recognizing that the cycle is highly dependent on the nature of the research project. 

As we become more experienced, we may expect to move through this cycle much more quickly. The sense of integrity comes from the ability to view all areas of the experiential learning model as an integrated set of skills rather than as discrete activities. 

Thursday, 19 February 2015 14:49

EDU 4003 - Week 3 - Collect data

Collect Data

This week, we will start to collect and analyse some data. Lets look at my Twitter account and see what quantitative and qualitative data we can glean from that data set.

 

Artful Competence

We have discussed this concept before (scroll down to Competency Sphere), but perhaps have not discussed what you think it means.

artful competence 200

Have a look at this article and focus on the competencies. These are for doctors, but many of the competencies equally apply to teachers.

 


 

  •  Remind me to talk to you about some housekeeping details
    • Classes next week
      • Monday & Tuesday
      • Thursday
    • Assessments & Moodle

Cognitive

Core knowledge 
Basic communication skills 
Information management 
Applying knowledge to real-world situations 
Using tacit knowledge and personal experience 
Abstract problem-solving 
Self-directed acquisition of new knowledge 
Recognizing gaps in knowledge 
Generating questions 
Using resources (eg, published evidence, colleagues) 
Learning from experience

Technical
Physical examination skills 
Surgical/procedural skills

Integrative
Incorporating scientific, clinical, and humanistic judgment 
Using clinical reasoning strategies appropriately (hypothetico-deductive, pattern-recognition, elaborated knowledge) 
Linking basic and clinical knowledge across disciplines 
Managing uncertainty

Context
Clinical setting 
Use of time

Relationship
Communication skills 
Handling conflict 
Teamwork 
Teaching others (eg, patients, students, and colleagues)

Affective/Moral
Tolerance of ambiguity and anxiety 
Emotional intelligence 
Respect for patients 
Responsiveness to patients and society 
Caring

Habits of Mind
Observations of one's own thinking, emotions, and techniques 
Attentiveness 
Critical curiosity 
Recognition of and response to cognitive and emotional biases 
Willingness to acknowledge and correct errors

 


 I have written quite a range of entries about different types of artefacts. Here is one written for Ramaqia School. See the portfolio assessment as well for further suggestions.

Table X:

Curated Artefacts

Competency

Artefact

Professionalism and Understanding

Certificates of Workshop attendance

Anecdotes from colleagues

Images of professional treatment of guests

Curated collection of work clearly related to competencies

Planning for learning

Lesson plans

Photos of arranged / organized classrooms

Anecdotes from repairing / rearranging classrooms & equipment

Implementing and Managing Learning

Videos / images from the classroom

Observations from colleagues, MST, MCT, principal

Feedback from surveys, student reactions

Assessment and Evaluation

Products from student activities

Test scores and graphs

Anecdotes from students on what they learned

Reflection

Journal entries

Daily reflective entries

Curated collection of work

 


 

I would like to make a list of all the competencies you think you need to demonstrate and then design a chart in which you tell us how you are going to demonstrate these competencies.

It could look something like the ones that we have given you.

Alternatively, it could look like something totally different.

References

Epstein R.M., Hundert, E.M. (2002). Defining and Assessing Professional Competence. Journal of American Medical Association.;287(2) pps 226-235. doi:10.1001/jama.287.2.226.

Tuesday, 10 February 2015 04:12

EDT 3503 - Week 2 & 3 - LMS Survey

This week, the server is down for upgrading. So, we will not be able to access our Moodle site, or the Mahara site.


We will continue to work on the first assignment. We discussed this last week, but lets just review the assessment document.

For this week, we will start to work on the first assignment which will come up very quickly.  

Lets brainstorm on the board the various features that you need to address in your presentation. The first few items are borrowed from and relate to the 3703 course. You will cover that with Mr. Basel. Then, for the next part, you need to review some of the features of the Moodle site. To do this, it will be beneficial to review the features of moodle and then decide which ones are most relevant to you. 

Look at the Moodle site. What are the most relevant features? Which features will help you to achieve your learning object objectives? We will make a list, and then assign a section to pairs of you. You will then present a short overview and submit a slide to our shared google drive folder.

3503 moodle pres sched

In conjunction with this, I am tasking each pair with reviewing the plugins list and finding one plugin that relates to their area. You should read about the plugin, and if we have a chance you will actually install that plugin on your moodle site.

As a reminder, here is a detailed overview of your learning objects from our notes last semester.

learning object moodle diagram

 


 

Have a look at this comparison chart:

http://lms.softwareinsider.com/compare/83-226/Blackboard-Learn-LMS-vs-Moodle

Monday, 09 February 2015 14:36

EPC 3909 - Week 2 - Being Competent

Discussion from last week

hct competencies

Lets continue our discussion from last week. You have done an appreciative inquiry of your lesson plans and we want to share these ideas. What is the best way?

  • Google Drive?
  • Mahara?

Can we create a checklist or a rubric of our own with which to guide our lesson planning?

 


As a follow up discussion, lets have a quick look at Schmidt, p. 18. from last week. What is a common point that he is trying to make about planning for lessons?

 

Modern Musical Notation

 

If we scroll down to page 23, he poses a question:

  • What is the role of teaching experience in the development of content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge, and pedagogical content knowledge?

 


 

Our next step, will be to discuss:

  • How can you effectively manage your associated files, folders and materials?
    • How can relevant materials be shared with students or stakeholders?
    • How can your colleagues share your work and comment on it?
    • How can you present to your supervisors?

Reflective Journals

Read the article by Blaschke and Brindley (2011). Scroll down to "A Means for Reflective Thinking...Using Social Media". read this section carefully to see how you might apply the strategies to your own practice. Further down, they discuss the assessment strategy for the reflective journals. You will be comforted to know we are using assessment strategies for you that are consistent with best practices around the world.

Examine the article by Canning and Callan (2010). Go to the section entitled "Pre-requisites for heutagogy: learner identity and emotional literacy". Note that they discuss how students must be taught strategies for reflection and that the process is far more important than the product at the end.

 


 

References

Blaschke, L. M., & Brindley, J. E. (2011). Establishing a foundation for reflective practice: A case study of learning journal use. European Journal of Open and Distance E-Learning(Special Issue). Retrieved January 25, 2014, fromhttp://www.eurodl.org/materials/special/2011/Blaschke_Brindley.pdf

Canning, N., & Callan, S. (2010). Heutagogy: Spirals of reflection to empower learners in higher education. Reflective Practice: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 11(1), 71-82. Retrieved January 25, 2014, fromhttp://www.tandfonline.com.ezproxy.hct.ac.ae/doi/pdf/10.1080/14623940903500069

Schmidt, M. (2005). Preservice string teachers' lesson-planning processes: An exploratory study.Journal of Research in Music Education,53(1), 6-25. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/214477037?accountid=1215

Sunday, 08 February 2015 01:09

EPC 4909 - Week 2 - Being Competent

Introduction

Over the next few weeks, we will look at various areas of your planning and preparation including document keeping and the demonstration of competencies.

epms Behavioral Competencies process

Have a look at the FAHR Behavioral Competencies document and discuss how to better demonstrate them. One aspect of the 'artful competence' that Schon (1984) talks about is being artful in your ability to demonstrate how you are competent.

To demonstrate artfulness, lets just have a quick look to see what FAHR has to say about the competencies and your ability to demonstrate them.

See sections:

  • 2.2 - What are behavioural competencies
  • 2.5 - Benefits of using competencies
  • 3.3 - Competency clusters and your own goals.

hct competencies

 


 

Capturing Evidence

Reflective Journals

Read the article by Blaschke and Brindley (2011). Scroll down to "A Means for Reflective Thinking...Using Social Media". read this section carefully to see how you might apply the strategies to your own practice. Further down, they discuss the assessment strategy for the reflective journals. You will be comforted to know we are using assessment strategies for you that are consistent with best practices around the world.

Examine the article by Canning and Callan (2010). Go to the section entitled "Pre-requisites for heutagogy: learner identity and emotional literacy". Note that they discuss how students must be taught strategies for reflection and that the process is far more important than the product at the end.

Artefacts

An artefact is a thing that is created as part of your work. It generally is not something you create specifically for the purposes of evaluation or demonstration of competency.

I have written quite a range of entries about different types of artefacts. Here is one written for Ramaqia School. See the portfolio assessment as well for further suggestions.

Table X:

Curated Artefacts

Competency

Artefact

Professionalism and Understanding

Certificates of Workshop attendance

Anecdotes from colleagues

Images of professional treatment of guests

Curated collection of work clearly related to competencies

Planning for learning

Lesson plans

Photos of arranged / organized classrooms

Anecdotes from repairing / rearranging classrooms & equipment

Implementing and Managing Learning

Videos / images from the classroom

Observations from colleagues, MST, MCT, principal

Feedback from surveys, student reactions

Assessment and Evaluation

Products from student activities

Test scores and graphs

Anecdotes from students on what they learned

Reflection

Journal entries

Daily reflective entries

Curated collection of work

Processes

Have a look at this document on describing competencies. In this document, they talk about describing the situation and describing the outcome. You may be able to supplement these two factors through artefacts.

References

Blaschke, L. M., & Brindley, J. E. (2011). Establishing a foundation for reflective practice: A case study of learning journal use. European Journal of Open and Distance E-Learning(Special Issue). Retrieved January 25, 2014, from http://www.eurodl.org/materials/special/2011/Blaschke_Brindley.pdf

Canning, N., & Callan, S. (2010). Heutagogy: Spirals of reflection to empower learners in higher education. Reflective Practice: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 11(1), 71-82. Retrieved January 25, 2014, from http://www.tandfonline.com.ezproxy.hct.ac.ae/doi/pdf/10.1080/14623940903500069

 

 

 

Saturday, 07 February 2015 21:31

EDU 4503 - Week 2 - Questions and Competencies

Research Questions

We made a great start last week to refine your research questions. This week, we will spend more time to make sure you have a very clear idea of:

  • Research focus
    • Research question
      • Specific or enabling questions

Remember the definition of action research. You need to:

  • Identify an area of focus
    • We worked on this last semester. You should have a very clear idea of the focus of your research. This may be considered a guiding explanation of what you want to do in your classroom.
  • Collect Data
    • You collected data last semester and now should have...
  • Analyze and interpret data
    • ... a preliminary plan of what you hope to achieve.
  • Develop an action plan
    • Your action plan is how you intend to conduct your research in the first 6 weeks of the placement.
    • This starts with your research questions and then you need to work out just what you are going to do to conduct your research.

 


This week, we will start by reviewing a few more questions. Then we will discuss just how you will gather your data. You need to work with both your school colleagues to determine:

  • Survey questions?
  • Sustainability of your resources
  • Sharing of data
  • Collection and observation methods.

 action research


 

Visual Text: From the assessment document

We will spend some time together to look at the Mahara site and determine what tools you need to employ. A note: Mahara will not be available later this week.

 visual text map


 

You will design, create and present a visual text that represents the process of your action research during the first 6 weeks of the Teaching Practicum. At this time you will record the process in your portfolio through images, reflective entries, interviews and show your planning.

visual text planning

This will be tracked in a Mahara Collection of embedded libraries. You are encouraged to take advantage of each other’s knowledge and journey so you should visit other student’s collections and invite them to visit your collection.

Your visual text will be a framework to show and present your research project and it will demonstrate the process undertaken by:

  1. Recording the active process of your research project by using different mediums or methods of display
  2. Highlighting and identifying significant events or stages in the research process
  3. Representing your reflection of the research process across time
  4. Recording information, insights and experiences during the research action cycles
  5. Including symbols, icons, settings, characters, emphases, pictures, photos, models, cut-outs, drawings, 3D images, graphics to show this information and record process and outcomes.

Following your explanatory presentation you will be asked questions by your peers and faculty about the visual text and the process.

vt board notes

Planning Process

You will need to plan the visual text by selecting the content and format. The content will represent the planned actions and experiences during the implementation stage of the project. The format is how you plan to represent this process which has two aspects: information and physical display (layout). You can use color; many mediums (symbols, diagrams, illustrations, paper textures, images, cardboard, textiles, models, animation and videos) in the physical display but it must be transportable for display and be a presentation.

vt collection

The content information will be integrated into the display so it describes and explains the research process. The structure, layout and language features (titles, captions, text) should work together to create a cohesive and creative representation of your research.

Consider:

  1. Background image(s) and colors
  2. Layout to display a clear timeline which is easy for the audience to follow
  3. Significant events to be recorded
  4. Heading, titles, text, captions, speech bubbles ( font size, color, bold, discreet)
  5. Visual images that support or explain
  6. Additional display material
  7. Text above an image is an ‘attention grabber’ and has new information
  8. Text below an image contains information that is understood

Then look at your visual text and ask:

  1. Is there a clear indication of the heading and purpose of this visual text?
  2. Does the visual text clearly show and explain the action research process?
  3. Is there text that shows emphasis?
  4. Is there a clear and recognizable reading path for the audience?
  5. Are the visual messages clear or confusing?
  6. Does the layout and design capture the audience’s attention?
  7. Does the composition of the visual text clearly represent my research project?

 

Saturday, 07 February 2015 20:44

EDU 4203 -Week 2 & 3 - Mapping

Review of last week

Because our time together was cut short last week, we are going to review some of the images I provided for discussion. Have a look at last week's post to see the three different views of curriculum. We will also revisit the idea of a risk-rich curriculum and see how that might fit into the UAE cultural ideas.

Lets read through this article and discuss what are acceptable parameters in the UAE.

Learning Outcomes

We will also spend a bit of time to read an article about learning outcomes:

Ascough, R. S. (2011). Learning (about) outcomes: How the focus on assessment can help overall course design. The Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 41(2), 44-61. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/895070208?accountid=1215

You can find this article in the "Files". The article is actually discussing learning outcomes for higher education, which will certainly apply to your next assignment. However, it also discusses more generally what learning outcomes are and how we might realize them in the classroom.

Here are some focusing questions:

  • Why might it be important to be clear with your students, especially older students, about the outcomes for a course?
  • What exactly is an outcome, according to the article?
  • Explain, with examples relevant to the early childhood classroom, the three domains of learning described on page 48.
  • Write one outcome for each domain, using the verbs discussed on page 51, that would be suitable for a KG 2 class. 
  • What will you expect students to actually do and what will you accept as evidence to show parents or the principal?

4203 outcomes

Non-curricular Outcomes

Lets have a look at a video in which the presenter talks about some of the determinants of success. See below.

What does she talk about and how would you define it?

In groups, think about your own experiences in school and try to make a list of what you think might be non-curricular skills that students might need to develop. 

Can you compare these skills to those listed in the article by Carpenter and Pease (2013) (http://www.joci.ecu.edu/index.php/JoCI/article/view/274/pdf)

See pages 39, 42, 44, 45.

Assignment 1

Task:

You are required to map an Education program. You will have an overview map of one stream of the entire program, which you may complete in groups and a year-level map of one year of your assigned program stream.

16469450911 63c4e8d109 z

Please note that the overview map itself will not be graded. However, you will need to refer to it and make links from your year-level map to the overview map.

The rest of the assignment is individual.

15848673764 cef60e2a49 k

 

4203 mapping1

The maps should be suitable to show to Foundations students that may be considering a career as a teacher.

Your assessment will consider and demonstrate connections between:

Overview Map of Education Program:

  • The entire program
  • Streams within the program
  • Year groups within the stream

Year-level map

  • Courses within each year group
  • Outcomes within each program-specific course

Your maps will allow viewers to see the relationship / connection of an individual course outcome to the ever-increasing context of the course, the year, and the stream.

You should follow the program mapping outline provided here:

http://www.slideshare.net/paulleslie/program-mapping-edu4203

You will be provided with all program / course outlines and outcomes.

Format

Both maps will be designed together on one A3 size paper. You may use MS Word or Publisher. Upon consultation with your teacher, you may also use another suitable program.

Your assessment will contain:

  • Overview map demonstrating the entire program (this may be completed in groups)
  • A year-level map of one year of the program with a focus on the program-specific courses.
  • Explanatory text that helps to explain the relation between the courses within your assigned year and to the larger program.
  • This text may include abbreviated course outcomes or descriptions.
  • Suitable labels and titles

*Part of the assessment is your ability to condense a lot of information. This is why you are only allowed one A3 sized paper.

Submission

You will submit:

  • A3 sized document of the maps with your name and ID prominently displayed.

To the assignment drop box as arranged by your instructor.

Sample from last semester - Don't let this influence your own mapping activity by giving you preconceived ideas.

4203 semester map

 

Just for fun, here is a photo from our own faculty mapping activity last semester at DWC.

edtc mapping faculty

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